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Florida Trial Lawyer Offers $100,000 Reward for Evidence That Corporations Are Behind Frivolous Lawsuits Against Corporations

Florida Trial Lawyer Offers $100,000 Reward for Evidence That Corporations Are Behind Frivolous Lawsuits Against Corporations

- Corporate Crime Reporter
A Florida trial attorney recently filed a consumer class action lawsuit against McDonald’s claiming that the burger giant was charging consumers the same amount for a quarter pounder as it charges for a quarter pounder with cheese.
To John Uustal, a fellow Florida trial lawyer, the case sounded like a frivolous lawsuit – the kind that corporate lobbyists use to mock and undermine the civil justice system.
Uustal took to his blog last month and offered a $100,000 reward...

Attorney offers reward over suspicions lawsuit manufactured by tort reform advocates

Attorney offers reward over suspicions lawsuit manufactured by tort reform advocates

- Florida Record
A Florida attorney is offering a $100,000 reward to anyone who can confirm his suspicion that a lawsuit against fast food giant McDonalds over cheese on its burgers is frivolous.
The federal lawsuit, filed in the Southern District of Florida, accuses the company, and its franchisees, of over charging for its quarter pounders served without cheese.
And one of the attorneys, who filed on behalf of two south Florida residents, claimed the overcharging may have impacted approximately 25...

100000-reward-on-suspect-class-action-vs-mcdonalds

100000-reward-on-suspect-class-action-vs-mcdonalds

‘Frivolous Lawsuit Conspiracy’ Whistleblowers Wanted, Potential $100,000 Reward

- Whistleblower News Review
Florida-based attorney John Uustal just announced he is offering up to $100,000 to the first person who comes forward with proof of “a secret conspiracy to create frivolous lawsuits.”
Uustal is a trial lawyer and author, famous for holding massive corporations responsible for their misconduct. The list of corporate titans he has successfully brought to justice includes the likes of Philip Morris, Toyota, and General Motors.
To Cheese or Not to Cheese Uustal’s...

Keyless ignition linked to two dozen deaths

Keyless ignition linked to two dozen deaths

- Autocar
Walking up to your car, getting in and pushing a button instead of turning a key makes you feel like you’ve really made it, right, but there’s a problem.
A recent report by the New York Times has found more than two dozen people in the US have died from carbon monoxide poisoning after forgetting to turn off their engines, thanks to keyless systems. In total, 28 people died from the issue while 45 others suffered injuries from carbon monoxide exposure.
While it’s easy...

Keyless Ignitions Blamed for At Least 28 Deaths

Keyless Ignitions Blamed for At Least 28 Deaths

They died from carbon monoxide after leaving engines on

- Newser
"After 75 years of driving, my father thought that when he took the key with him when he left the car, the car would be off," says Doug Schaub. His father, Fred, was among at least 28 people identified by the New York Times as having died from carbon monoxide poisoning after accidentally leaving their keyless-ignition car running in a garage. More than 40 others have been injured, some with brain damage so severe that they struggle to perform everyday tasks. The problem, industry experts say,...

Deadly Convenience: Keyless Cars and Their Carbon Monoxide Toll

Deadly Convenience: Keyless Cars and Their Carbon Monoxide Toll

Weaned from using a key, drivers have left cars running in garages, spewing exhaust into homes. Despite years of deaths, regulatory action has lagged.

- The New York Times
Without having to turn and remove a key to shut off the motor, drivers can be lulled into mistakenly thinking that the car has stopped running.
It seems like a common convenience in a digital age: a car that can be powered on and off with the push of a button, rather than the mechanical turning of a key. But it is a convenience that can have a deadly effect.
On a summer morning last year, Fred Schaub drove his Toyota RAV4 into the garage attached to his Florida home and went into...

What caused FIU’s bridge to fall? More clues come to light.

What caused FIU’s bridge to fall? More clues come to light.

- Miami Herald
If tightening support cables caused Florida International University’s signature new pedestrian bridge to collapse, as Sen. Marco Rubio has suggested in a tweet, the rubble spread across the Tamiami Trail could contain obvious clues, bridge experts say.
Adjusting tension cables, which ran like tendons through the 950-ton concrete span and the struts that connected a concrete canopy on the bridge to the walkway, can be a delicate operation. Over-tightening the cables, which are used...

Police pull Fords from service over carbon monoxide fears

Police pull Fords from service over carbon monoxide fears

Austin, Texas, police pull 37 SUVs from fleet

- CNN
Some police say their Ford Motor SUV police cars are leaking exhaust fumes into their vehicles, causing officers to suffer from carbon monoxide poisoning.
Federal safety officials are looking into the allegations surrounding the Ford Police Interceptor, a version of the Ford Explorer modified for police use. They have yet to open a formal investigation.
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has already investigated more than 150 complaints from Ford Explorer owners...

Exploding e-cigs will soon be subject to regulatory oversight

Exploding e-cigs will soon be subject to regulatory oversight

The booming e-cig market has been largely unregulated

- Local 10 WPLG News
As the e-cigarette market grew in popularity, so did calls for oversight and regulation following reports from across the country of e-cigs exploding or catching fire.
From January 2015 to January 2016, scientists from the FDA's Center for Tobacco Products have identified 66 reports of e-cigs overheating, catching fire or exploding.
Dr. Carl Schulman of the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Burn Center said those numbers are probably only scratching the surface of what has become...

Federal regulators considering safety changes to keyless ignition vehicles

Federal regulators considering safety changes to keyless ignition vehicles

Carbon monoxide poisoning survivor says incidents could have been prevented

- Local 10 WPLG News
Federal regulators are considering safety changes to a popular car feature that has proven deadly in several Florida cases.
Keyless ignition vehicles are increasingly popular and don't require a key to turn off the engine. Critics say drivers often forget to push a button to turn off the vehicle, leading carbon monoxide to flood into the home and kill those inside without warning.
"For many, many years people take their key, they go into their house and they know their car is off,"...